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FIP Year In Review

FIP Month in Review

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2015-07-15
Multiple Discoveries from NASA's New Horizons Pluto Mission

2014-07-09
R.I.P. William 'Bill' Herbert Kelder - Intellpuke

2013-11-28
Gamers Donate 37,500 Pounds Of Food To Needy

2013-09-30
Statement From The Whitehouse Regarding The Government Shutdown

2013-09-29
An Open Response To 'Organizing for Action'

2013-08-26
Bayou Corne: The Biggest Ongoing Disaster In The U.S. You Have Not Heard Of

2013-04-21
Boston Mayor Hopes Feds 'Throw the Book' at Marathon Bombing Suspect

2013-04-19
Boston Police Closing In On Suspects

2013-04-15
2 Explosions At Boston Marathon. 2 Dead, Many Injured.

2013-01-03
The Press vs Citizens Rights and Privacy - Act 3

2012-12-30
CBS News - Year In Review 2012

Nature.com - 366 Days: 2012 In Review

The Guardian - 2012 In Review: An Interactive Guide To The Year That Was

TruTV - The Biggest Conspiracy Theories of 2012

Colbert Nation: 2012: A Look Back

FIP Year In Review(s?)

2012-12-25
Happy Holidays

2012-12-21
Welcome To A New Era!

2012-12-16
An Open Letter To United Health Care, Medcom, And The Medical Insurance Industry In General

2012-11-17
Whitehouse Petition To Remove "Under God" and "In God" From Currency And The Pledge.

2012-11-15
December 21, 2012

2012-11-11
If Hillary Clinton Ran For President, She Would Probably Be The Best-prepared Candidate In American History

2012-11-10
CIA Director David Petraeus Resigns After FBI Investigation Uncovers Affair With High-Profile Journalist

FIP Format Update

2012-11-07
Thank you for voting.

2012-11-06
Live Election Results

2012-09-30
FIP In Hiatus

2012-09-18
U.S.-Afghan Military Operations Suspended After Attacks

Iran Nuclear Chief Says IAEA Might Be Infiltrated By 'Terrorists And Saboteurs'

Romney Stands By Gaffe





Free Internet Press - News Aggregator
Updated every 10 minutes.
How We Epically Obliterated an $800 Lego Star Destroyer
2016-05-04 13:16:23 (2 minutes ago) 
Here's how we crushed a Lego Star Destroyer and captured the whole thing at 1,000 frames-per-second. Happy Star Wars Day! The post How We Epically Obliterated an $800 Lego Star Destroyer appeared first on WIRED.
 
Space boffins win $3m prize for discovering gravitational waves
2016-05-04 13:16:13 (2 minutes ago) 
 
Collins Suggests She Might Back Trump
2016-05-04 13:16:01 (3 minutes ago) 

Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) said that she will be able to back Donald Trump if he starts acting more presidential and stops with the “gratuitous personal insults,” BuzzFeed reports.

Said Collins: “Donald Trump has the opportunity to unite the party, but if he’s going to build that wall that he keeps talking about, he’s going to have to mend a lot of fences.”

 
Having an overactive immune system may prime you for depression
2016-05-04 13:15:02 (4 minutes ago) 
Blood tests could help doctors identify people who are at risk of severe depressive episodes, and enable them to tailor more effective treatments
 
Corrigendum: DDX5 and its associated lncRNA Rmrp modulate TH17 cell effector functions
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Corrigendum: DDX5 and its associated lncRNA Rmrp modulate TH17 cell effector functions

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature16968

Authors: Wendy Huang, Benjamin Thomas, Ryan A. Flynn, Samuel J. Gavzy, Lin Wu, Sangwon V. Kim, Jason A. Hall, Emily R. Miraldi, Charles P. Ng, Frank Rigo, Sarah Meadows, Nina R. Montoya, Natalia G. Herrera, Ana I. Domingos, Fraydoon Rastinejad, Richard M. Myers, Frances V. Fuller-Pace, Richard Bonneau, Howard Y. Chang, Oreste Acuto & Dan R. Littman

Nature528, 517–522 (2015); doi: 10.1038/nature16193In this Article, author ‘Frank Rigo’ was incorrectly listed with a middle initial; this has been corrected in the online versions of the paper.

 
Ubiquitination independent of E1 and E2 enzymes by bacterial effectors
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Ubiquitination independent of E1 and E2 enzymes by bacterial effectors

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17657

Authors: Jiazhang Qiu, Michael J. Sheedlo, Kaiwen Yu, Yunhao Tan, Ernesto S. Nakayasu, Chittaranjan Das, Xiaoyun Liu & Zhao-Qing Luo

Signalling by ubiquitination regulates virtually every cellular process in eukaryotes. Covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate is catalysed by the E1, E2 and E3 three-enzyme cascade, which links the carboxy terminus of ubiquitin to the ε-amino group of, in most cases, a lysine of the substrate via an isopeptide bond. Given the essential roles of ubiquitination in the regulation of the immune system, it is not surprising that the ubiquitination network is a common target for diverse infectious agents. For example, many bacterial pathogens exploit ubiquitin signalling using virulence factors that function as E3 ligases, deubiquitinases or as enzymes that directly attack ubiquitin. The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila utilizes approximately 300 effectors that modulate diverse host processes to create a permissive niche for its replication in phagocytes. Here we demonstrate that members of the SidE effector family of L. pneumophila ubiquitinate multiple Rab small GTPases associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we show that these proteins are capable of catalysing ubiquitination without the need for the E1 and E2 enzymes. A putative mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase motif critical for the ubiquitination activity is also essential for the role of the SidE family in intracellular bacterial replication in a protozoan host. The E1/E2-independent ubiquitination catalysed by these enzymes is energized by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which activates ubiquitin by the formation of ADP-ribosylated ubiquitin. These results establish that ubiquitination can be catalysed by a single enzyme, the activity of which does not require ATP.

 
Unique human immune signature of Ebola virus disease in Guinea
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Unique human immune signature of Ebola virus disease in Guinea

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17949

Authors: Paula Ruibal, Lisa Oestereich, Anja Lüdtke, Beate Becker-Ziaja, David M. Wozniak, Romy Kerber, Miša Korva, Mar Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Joseph A. Bore, Fara Raymond Koundouno, Sophie Duraffour, Romy Weller, Anja Thorenz, Eleonora Cimini, Domenico Viola, Chiara Agrati, Johanna Repits, Babak Afrough, Lauren A. Cowley, Didier Ngabo, Julia Hinzmann, Marc Mertens, Inês Vitoriano, Christopher H. Logue, Jan Peter Boettcher, Elisa Pallasch, Andreas Sachse, Amadou Bah, Katja Nitzsche, Eeva Kuisma, Janine Michel, Tobias Holm, Elsa-Gayle Zekeng, Isabel García-Dorival, Roman Wölfel, Kilian Stoecker, Erna Fleischmann, Thomas Strecker, Antonino Di Caro, Tatjana Avšič-Županc, Andreas Kurth, Silvia Meschi, Stephane Mély, Edmund Newman, Anne Bocquin, Zoltan Kis, Anne Kelterbaum, Peter Molkenthin, Fabrizio Carletti, Jasmine Portmann, Svenja Wolff, Concetta Castilletti, Gordian Schudt, Alexandra Fizet, Lisa J. Ottowell, Eva Herker, Thomas Jacobs, Birte Kretschmer, Ettore Severi, Nobila Ouedraogo, Mar Lago, Anabel Negredo, Leticia Franco, Pedro Anda, Stefan Schmiedel, Benno Kreuels, Dominic Wichmann, Marylyn M. Addo, Ansgar W. Lohse, Hilde De Clerck, Carolina Nanclares, Sylvie Jonckheere, Michel Van Herp, Armand Sprecher, Gao Xiaojiang, Mary Carrington, Osvaldo Miranda, Carlos M. Castro, Martin Gabriel, Patrick Drury, Pierre Formenty, Boubacar Diallo, Lamine Koivogui, N’Faly Magassouba, Miles W. Carroll, Stephan Günther & César Muñoz-Fontela

Despite the magnitude of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, there is still a fundamental lack of knowledge about the pathophysiology of EVD. In particular, very little is known about human immune responses to Ebola virus. Here we evaluate the physiology of the human T cell immune response in EVD patients at the time of admission to the Ebola Treatment Center in Guinea, and longitudinally until discharge or death. Through the use of multiparametric flow cytometry established by the European Mobile Laboratory in the field, we identify an immune signature that is unique in EVD fatalities. Fatal EVD was characterized by a high percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing the inhibitory molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1, which correlated with elevated inflammatory markers and high virus load. Conversely, surviving individuals showed significantly lower expression of CTLA-4 and PD-1 as well as lower inflammation, despite comparable overall T cell activation. Concomitant with virus clearance, survivors mounted a robust Ebola-virus-specific T cell response. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the T cell response is a key component of EVD pathophysiology.

 
Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17434

Authors: Antonio Caracausi, Guillaume Avice, Peter G. Burnard, Evelyn Füri & Bernard Marty

Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth’s mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth’s mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth’s accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion.

 
Resolved atomic lines reveal outflows in two ultraluminous X-ray sources
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Resolved atomic lines reveal outflows in two ultraluminous X-ray sources

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17417

Authors: Ciro Pinto, Matthew J. Middleton & Andrew C. Fabian

Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources in galaxies, and have X-ray luminosities in excess of 3 × 1039 ergs per second. They are thought to be powered by accretion onto a compact object. Possible explanations include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, onto stellar-mass black holes (of up to 20 solar masses) at or in excess of the classical Eddington limit, or onto intermediate-mass black holes (103–105 solar masses). The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. Here we report the presence of X-ray emission lines arising from highly ionized iron, oxygen and neon with a cumulative significance in excess of five standard deviations, together with blueshifted (about 0.2 times light velocity) absorption lines of similar significance, in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 1313 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1. The blueshifted absorption lines must occur in a fast-outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. We conclude that the compact object in each source is surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2 times that of light, as predicted by models of accreting supermassive black holes and hyper-accreting stellar-mass black holes.

 
Nuclear physics: Elusive transition spotted in thorium
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Nuclear physics: Elusive transition spotted in thorium

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533044a

Authors: Marianna Safronova

The highly precise atomic clocks used in science and technology are based on electronic transitions in atoms. The discovery of a nuclear transition in thorium-229 raises hopes of making nuclear clocks a reality. See Article p.47

 
Bioengineering: Evolved to overcome Bt-toxin resistance
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Bioengineering: Evolved to overcome Bt-toxin resistance

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17893

Authors: Daniel Dovrat & Amir Aharoni

Insects readily evolve resistance to insecticidal proteins that are introduced into genetically modified crop plants. Continuous directed evolution has now been used to engineer a toxin that overcomes insect resistance. See Article p.58

 
Collaboration: The geography of discovery
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Collaboration: The geography of discovery

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S40a

Author: Emily Sohn

Despite the ubiquity of the Internet, innovation still happens mainly in hubs, where face-to-face contact matters more than ever.

 
Assessment: Academic return
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Assessment: Academic return

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S20a

Author: Michael Eisenstein

A broader understanding of 'impact' could help governments to measure the diverse benefits of their investment in research.

 
Research commercialization
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Research commercialization

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S5a

Author: Herb Brody

 
Relationships: Scions of science
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Relationships: Scions of science

Nature (2016). doi:10.1038/nj7601-131a

Author: Amber Dance

Relatives in the same career bring advantages — and challenges — for junior researchers.

 
Environment: Curb anchor scour for green shipping
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Environment: Curb anchor scour for green shipping

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533036a

Authors: Andrew R. Davis & Allison Broad

In charting a course for the greening of the shipping industry (Z.Wanget al. Nature530, 275–277; 10.1038/530275a2016), we should also mitigate the scouring of seafloor biota by the massive anchors and long dragging chains dropped

 
Policy: Security spending must cover disease outbreaks
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Policy: Security spending must cover disease outbreaks

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533029a

Authors: Tadataka Yamada, V. Ayano Ogawa & Maria Freire

Tadataka Yamada, V. Ayano Ogawa and Maria Freire call for research and development funding and coordination to counter global infectious-disease threats.

 
US and China eye up European gravitational-wave mission
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

US and China eye up European gravitational-wave mission

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533019a

Author: Elizabeth Gibney

Space-based detector draws interest, but regulatory hurdles might complicate a partnership.

 
The week in science: 29 April–5 May 2016
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

The week in science: 29 April–5 May 2016

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533012a

New Mars missions shape up; Nobel laureate passes away; and a marten stops the world’s biggest science experiment.

 
Reproductive biology: Catching sperm for contraception
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Reproductive biology: Catching sperm for contraception

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011c

Mouse and human sperm bind to specially designed polymer beads, which could one day be used to select sperm for fertility treatments or to block conception.Mammalian sperm binds to the ZP2 protein, part of a matrix that surrounds the egg. Jurrien Dean at the

 
Immunology: Why older people are prone to flu
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Immunology: Why older people are prone to flu

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533010c

Minimizing responses from a type of immune cell could help to treat influenza in old people.The vast majority of influenza deaths are among older people. To find out what makes them vulnerable, Akiko Iwasaki at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and

 
Fat lot of good
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Fat lot of good

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533008a

Humans’ exceptional ability to burn through calories fuels our evolution.

 
Universal resilience patterns in complex networks
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature18019

Authors: Jianxi Gao, Baruch Barzel & Albert-László Barabási

 
Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17654

Authors: Herman Pontzer, Mary H. Brown, David A. Raichlen, Holly Dunsworth, Brian Hare, Kara Walker, Amy Luke, Lara R. Dugas, Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, Dale Schoeller, Jacob Plange-Rhule, Pascal Bovet, Terrence E. Forrester, Estelle V. Lambert, Melissa Emery Thompson, Robert W. Shumaker & Stephen R. Ross

Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day−1) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day−1, respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans’ greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans’ greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day−1), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history.

 
NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17998

Authors: Panos Zanos, Ruin Moaddel, Patrick J. Morris, Polymnia Georgiou, Jonathan Fischell, Greg I. Elmer, Manickavasagom Alkondon, Peixiong Yuan, Heather J. Pribut, Nagendra S. Singh, Katina S. S. Dossou, Yuhong Fang, Xi-Ping Huang, Cheryl L. Mayo, Irving W. Wainer, Edson X. Albuquerque, Scott M. Thompson, Craig J. Thomas, Carlos A. Zarate & Todd D. Gould

Major depressive disorder affects around 16 per cent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite the availability of numerous monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require several weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive, glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor) antagonist (R,S)-ketamine exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects after a single dose in patients with depression, but its use is associated with undesirable side effects. Here we show that the metabolism of (R,S)-ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant-related actions in mice. These antidepressant actions are independent of NMDAR inhibition but involve early and sustained activation of AMPARs (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors). We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side effects. Our data implicate a novel mechanism underlying the antidepressant properties of (R,S)-ketamine and have relevance for the development of next-generation, rapid-acting antidepressants.

 
Depression: Ketamine steps out of the darkness
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17897

Author: Roberto Malinow

The way in which ketamine exerts its antidepressant effects has been perplexing. Evidence that a metabolite of the drug is responsible, and acts on a different target from ketamine, might be the key to an answer.

 
Movie Review Scores Are Fundamentally Flawed
2016-05-04 13:14:47 (4 minutes ago) 

Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic have become our first stop in determining how good a movie is. Until recently, I had no idea how each site arrived at their review scores. Once I found out, I realized I’d been reading them all wrong.

Read more...

 
ISIS terror attacks have killed nearly 1,400 people
2016-05-04 13:14:13 (4 minutes ago) 
Since declaring its caliphate in June 2014, the self-proclaimed Islamic State has conducted or inspired at least 90 terrorist attacks in 21 countries other than Iraq and Syria, where its carnage has taken a much deadlier toll. Those attacks have killed at least 1,390 people and injured more than 2,000 others.
 
The other candidates photoshopped to have Trump's weird orange tan
2016-05-04 13:10:31 (8 minutes ago) 

The brilliant Jen Lewis, having untanned Trump to ghastly effect, writes that she "had another terrible thought." This time, she tried her hand at photoshopping his presidential rivals so that they have tans just like his. The results are nasty, as you'd expect, but not quite as nasty as the Flame-faced Fuckwit of Fifth Avenue.

 
Muni broadband limits tucked into totally unrelated traffic bill in Mo.
2016-05-04 13:10:28 (8 minutes ago) 

The Missouri State Capitol. (credit: Missouri House of Representatives)

The Missouri House of Representatives has passed a bill prohibiting traffic ticket quotas—which ordinarily wouldn't be much of a tech news story, but this particular bill includes an entirely unrelated provision that would make it a lot harder for cities and towns to offer Internet service to their residents.

The traffic ticket bill was approved by the Missouri Senate without any municipal broadband provision. But when it got to the House, Republican legislator Lyndall Fraker proposed an amendment preventing cities and towns from competing against private Internet service providers unless they meet certain conditions or have a municipality-wide vote. The House approved the bill, including Fraker's amendment, on Monday.

Missouri is one of about 20 states that already have restrictions on municipal telecom services, but Fraker's proposal would make it more difficult for cities and towns to offer broadband. The amendment was described yesterday by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance's Community Broadband Networks project, which urged Missouri residents to contact the bill sponsors "and explain how you feel about amendments that do not relate to the substance of their bill."

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
Air bag inflator recall to grow by 35 million to 40 million
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
DETROIT (AP) -- Takata has agreed to recall another 35 million to 40 million air bag inflators, a stunning increase that will more than double what already is the largest automotive recall in American history....
 
Air bag inflator recall to grow by 35 million to 40 million
2016-05-04 13:10:26 (8 minutes ago) 
DETROIT (AP) -- Takata has agreed to recall another 35 million to 40 million air bag inflators, a stunning increase that will more than double what already is the largest automotive recall in American history....
 
Watch Live: President Obama Speaks in Flint, Michigan on Water Crisis
2016-05-04 13:05:39 (13 minutes ago) 
A
 
APNewsBreak: Woman’s body rejecting face transplant
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Connecticut woman who underwent a face transplant five years ago after being attacked by a chimpanzee is back in a Boston hospital after doctors discovered her body is rejecting the transplant. Charla Nash says doctors have decided to end an experimental drug treatment and put her back on her original […]
 
Cost estimate of Los Angeles-area gas leak hits $665 million
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An energy company says expected costs from a massive gas leak near Los Angeles have ballooned to $665 million. Sempra Energy released the estimate in an earnings report Wednesday. Southern California Gas Co., which is owned by Sempra, had estimated costs of $250 million to $300 million. That figure didn’t include […]
 
15 Million Degrees: A Journey to the Centre of the Sun by Lucie Green – review
2016-05-04 13:05:31 (13 minutes ago) 
 
The Latest: Obama's arrival in Flint greeted by Gov. Snyder
2016-05-04 13:05:21 (13 minutes ago) 
 
The Margin: Artist who painted controversial Trump nude says one of his supporters attacked her
2016-05-04 13:04:37 (14 minutes ago) 
“I am sad that Trump, and many of his supporters, don’t find words enough to express their opinions — they need walls, waterboarding and punches.”
 
Labour battles to retain local power and build platform for 2020 campaign
2016-05-04 13:04:17 (14 minutes ago) 
 
Hulu's move into live TV is a cord-cutter's dream (The 3:59, Ep. 39) - CNET
2016-05-04 13:03:55 (15 minutes ago) 
The streaming service plans to start offering live sports, news and events alongside its recorded shows.
 
North Carolina Police Tasered Mentally Ill Man to Death in Jail—Then Covered It Up
2016-05-04 13:00:16 (18 minutes ago) 
24-year-old Brandon Bethea was in a padded cell when officers shot him in the chest with a taser.

The News Observer in North Carolina has filed a shocking and disturbing expose into the five-year cover-up by local deputies who tasered a mentally ill man to death.

Brandon Bethea was 24-years-old when Harnett County detention officers followed him into a padded cell and shot him in the chest with a taser. Bethea fell to the ground, still in leg shackles, as the officer pulled the trigger twice more jolting him with electricity. They left the cell, waiting 20 minutes to check if he was alive. He couldn’t be revived.

All of this was captured on the video below. But the deputy responsible remains an employee of the county jail, no charges have been filed and his boss — who helped cover up the homicide — ran unopposed in his last election. Republican Sheriff Larry Rollins even lied to reporters, claiming that the death was unavoidable.

The incident report later filed by the detective in charge of the case continued the cover-up. Saying, “During the altercation, Detention Officer John Clark deployed an electronic control device (Taser X26) in an attempt to gain control of Bethea and restrain him. Bethea was struck in the upper body with probes from the electronic control device at which time he complied and was restrained by Detention Officers,” the report reads. “…Bethea was conscious and alert at the time officers left him.”

Detective M.J. Toler swore the officer was injured during the incident and taken to the hospital. It was all a lie. Bethea was shocked because he was told to roll over but was incapacitated and couldn’t. Bethea was far from alert when officers left. According to the video, his arm moved a little and after two minutes he never moved again.

The medical examiner who did the autopsy even ruled the death a homicide. SBI agents were sent to investigate, but the full report that was sent to District Attorney Vernon Stewart is confidential under state law. Stewart refuses to release it to the public.

State inspectors from the Department of Health and Human Services were also sent in to investigate as part of a broader report on jail deaths. “Staff must recognize the difference between taking control of an inmate and changing the behavior of an inmate,” their report reads regarding Rollins’ actions. They too recognized that Bethea’s death was as a result of excessive force and could have been avoided.

Understandably, the family sued the county for the death and they quickly settled the case for $350,000. The last thing they needed was to go through a lengthy discovery phase where there was a chance the SBI report could become public. A federal judge approved a protective order to keep the records sealed.

The family was forced to sign an agreement “not to make any statements, written or verbal, or cause or encourage others to make any statements, written or verbal, that defame, disparage or in any way criticize the personal or professional reputation, practices or conduct of Releasees, or any of them.”

Even after the release of the video, District Attorney Stewart refuses to pursue the case.

Sheriff Rollins voluntarily resigned last month, two years before his term was to expire and he refuses to speak to the news on the incident.

Detention Officer John Clark remains armed and on duty. Over the last 5 years since the murder his pay has increased 20 percent, according to county records.

This is just one of several cases uncovered by the News Observer. Deputy Nicholas Kehagias didn’t have a search warrant to enter a home or arrest warrant to serve but that didn’t stop him from barging in and arresting John Livingston. The officer shot Livingston with a taser and when the officer dropped it and Livingston reached for it, the officer shot him three times. He was dead before paramedics arrived.

That isn’t the first or the last time Deputy Kehagias has exhibited problematic behavior. “More than a dozen people describe incidents of abuse or harassment by Deputy Nicholas Kehagias or a few other deputies on D squad; several complained to authorities,” the report details. Still, no actions have been taken.

 

 

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Suit: Louisiana Voter Registration Law Is Discriminatory
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
A federal lawsuit claims a Louisiana law discriminates against foreign-born, naturalized U.S. citizens by arbitrarily subjecting them to "heightened" voter registration requirements that don't apply to native-born citizens
 
The Latest: Inmate Advocate Decries Transfer of Inmates
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
A lawyer representing New Orleans inmates says the sheriff's plan to move hundreds of inmates to other jurisdictions could have a devastating effect on the city's criminal justice system
 
Obama visiting Flint for first time since water crisis began
2016-05-04 12:55:56 (23 minutes ago) 
adcelannotate = {"mobilepaywallcategory" : "MOBILE_PREM-NATIONAL_WORLD","nativepaywallcategory" : "NATIVE_PREM-NATIONAL_WORLD"};President Barack Obama is bringing a message to residents of Flint, Michigan — a promise for change after lead from old pipes tainted their drinking water.
 
Flying in Place
2016-05-04 12:55:49 (23 minutes ago) 

The miracle of birds in flight is something science is just beginning to understand. “Birds are masters of maneuverability,” Stanford University post-doc Dan Quinn says in the video above. Though methods to image and track birds in flight have improved, the wind tunnels often used to study them in depth were in need of an update.

 
Germany: Woman says she was held by horror house couple
2016-05-04 12:55:30 (23 minutes ago) 
BERLIN (AP) - A woman has told German investigators that she was held captive for around three months and was physically abused by a couple who are in custody for the deaths of two other women, police said Wednesday.
 
Navy SEAL killed in Iraq was trying to rescue others
2016-05-04 12:54:42 (24 minutes ago) 
Charles Keating was in a quick reaction force dispatched to rescue American military advisers that ended up in a large gun battle
 
Bobby Knight: No Benghazi on Trump's watch
2016-05-04 12:54:04 (24 minutes ago) 
Legendary Indiana basketball coach Bobby Knight, a Donald Trump supporter, said Wednesday he was not concerned about the businessman's rhetoric or the Republican Party unifying behind him.

 
Obama to declare Stonewall Inn the first national monument to LGBT rights
2016-05-04 12:50:21 (28 minutes ago) 

The Associated Press reports that the Stonewall Inn, birthplace of America's most fabulous protest, will become the first national monument to LGBT rights in the U.S.

The gritty tavern, known colloquially as the Stonewall, became a catalyst for the gay rights movement after police raided it on June 28, 1969. Bar-goers fought back, and many more joined in street protests over the following days in an uprising widely credited as the start of large-scale gay activism in New York and around the word. Annual pride parades in hundreds of cities commemorate the rebellion.

The White House declined to comment. Yet Obama has paid tribute to the site before, most notably in his second inaugural address in 2013. In what's believed to be the first reference to gay rights in an inaugural address, Obama said the principle of equality still guides the U.S. "just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall."

Tweet tip! Things that Stonewall was not:

• The birthplace of gay rights.
• A "gay" riot.
• Cornfed straight-acting country boys fixing the city.

 
ResetPlug is a $60 device to keep you trapped in crappy Wi-Fi hell
2016-05-04 12:50:19 (28 minutes ago) 

If you need this, you probably deserve this. (credit: ResetPlug)

It’s Monday night and you finally collapse into your favorite chair after a day that started at 5:00am. The dogs are crated, the kids are in bed, and your spouse has graciously agreed to do dinner clean-up. You lean your head back and sigh. There’s a whole week’s worth of worry stacked up in your forebrain, but for the next 20 minutes, none of it will matter. The tablet is warm in your hands as you tap the Netflix app, and you smile in anticipation of the one truly good thing that you’ll get to experience today. The theme song is already playing in your head: "Un—BREAKABLE! They’re alive, dammit! It’s a mir-a-cle!" For the next 20 minutes, you can escape.

…except you can’t, because instead of transporting you away from your worries, the stupid screen is showing a giant-ass error message: "Netflix is not available."

The vein in your forehead—you know the one, right at your hairline—starts throbbing. You can feel it. You know what comes next. You can already see it in your mind. You’re going to have to go upstairs into your youngest’s room—because for some incredibly insane reason the cable drop is in there, which makes you want to find the person who built the damn house and throttle them to death with six feet of coax—and you’re going to have to reach back under the kid’s bed, over the dust and the dog hair and the Lego bricks and broken Star Wars toys and whatever the hell else is under there and find the damn plug for the damn router. After you unplug and plug it back in, you’re going to have to lie there watching the damn lights on the stupid thing blink for minutes—whole minutes!—while your tiny window of Netflix time slowly trickles away.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
Budget woes ‘costly distraction,’ Ban says in appeal for more funding to UN Palestine refugee agency
2016-05-04 13:16:19 (2 minutes ago) 
A consequence of failing to fund the activities of the United Nations agency tasked with ensuring the wellbeing of Palestinian refugees across the Middle East would be an increased risk of extremism, more poverty, and a region even more riven by conflict, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warned today, urging donors to step up their financial support.
 
Space boffins win $3m prize for discovering gravitational waves
2016-05-04 13:16:13 (2 minutes ago) 
Special Breakthrough Prize for all scientists and engineers working on LIGO

The team of scientists involved in the successful detection of gravitational waves has been awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics – along with $3m.…

 
Donald Trump Isn’t Going to Be President
2016-05-04 13:15:55 (3 minutes ago) 

Now that Donald Trump is just a few delegates away from the Republican nomination, conversation among commentators has turned to his electability and his “pivot” to the general election. The same pundits who ignored the polls to say Trump would lose the nomination now urge us to take his odds seriously. He’ll take on a more “presidential tone.” He’ll attack Hillary Clinton on all sides. He’ll be formidable. He might even win.

 
New exoplanet trio may have been dried out by fiery young star
2016-05-04 13:15:02 (4 minutes ago) 
Three recently discovered nearby exoplanets may not be as habitable as they first looked, as their hot young star could have left them high and dry
 
Corrigendum: Discovery of Atg5/Atg7-independent alternative macroautophagy
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Corrigendum: Discovery of Atg5/Atg7-independent alternative macroautophagy

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature16538

Authors: Yuya Nishida, Satoko Arakawa, Kenji Fujitani, Hirofumi Yamaguchi, Takeshi Mizuta, Toku Kanaseki, Masaaki Komatsu, Kinya Otsu, Yoshihide Tsujimoto & Shigeomi Shimizu

Nature461, 654–658 (2009); doi:10.1038/nature08455In Supplementary Fig. 19a of this Letter, the ‘no treatment’ panels for Stx7 contain incorrect data, owing to an error in image placement during figure preparation. The Supplementary Information to this Corrigendum

 
Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the autoinflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the autoinflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17950

Authors: Jennifer Martinez, Larissa D. Cunha, Sunmin Park, Mao Yang, Qun Lu, Robert Orchard, Quan-Zhen Li, Mei Yan, Laura Janke, Cliff Guy, Andreas Linkermann, Herbert W. Virgin & Douglas R. Green

Defects in clearance of dying cells have been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease, and phagocytes from patients with SLE often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we and others described a form of noncanonical autophagy known as LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), in which phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate maturation of phagosomes and digestion of their contents. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the Atg5 (ref. 8) and possibly Atg7 (ref. 9) genes, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP, as markers of a predisposition for SLE. Here we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway show increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. When dying cells are injected into LAP-deficient mice, they are engulfed but not efficiently degraded and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient, mice accelerated the development of SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. By contrast, mice deficient in genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dying cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and, like wild-type mice, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE.

 
Parkinson-associated risk variant in distal enhancer of α-synuclein modulates target gene expression
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Parkinson-associated risk variant in distal enhancer of α-synuclein modulates target gene expression

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17939

Authors: Frank Soldner, Yonatan Stelzer, Chikdu S. Shivalila, Brian J. Abraham, Jeanne C. Latourelle, M. Inmaculada Barrasa, Johanna Goldmann, Richard H. Myers, Richard A. Young & Rudolf Jaenisch

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases, but mechanistic insights are impeded by a lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale epigenetic studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS-identified variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells. By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system, we identify a common Parkinson’s disease associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of α-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific transcription factors EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease-relevant phenotypes.

 
Scalable and sustainable electrochemical allylic C–H oxidation
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Scalable and sustainable electrochemical allylic C–H oxidation

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17431

Authors: Evan J. Horn, Brandon R. Rosen, Yong Chen, Jiaze Tang, Ke Chen, Martin D. Eastgate & Phil S. Baran

New methods and strategies for the direct functionalization of C–H bonds are beginning to reshape the field of retrosynthetic analysis, affecting the synthesis of natural products, medicines and materials. The oxidation of allylic systems has played a prominent role in this context as possibly the most widely applied C–H functionalization, owing to the utility of enones and allylic alcohols as versatile intermediates, and their prevalence in natural and unnatural materials. Allylic oxidations have featured in hundreds of syntheses, including some natural product syntheses regarded as “classics”. Despite many attempts to improve the efficiency and practicality of this transformation, the majority of conditions still use highly toxic reagents (based around toxic elements such as chromium or selenium) or expensive catalysts (such as palladium or rhodium). These requirements are problematic in industrial settings; currently, no scalable and sustainable solution to allylic oxidation exists. This oxidation strategy is therefore rarely used for large-scale synthetic applications, limiting the adoption of this retrosynthetic strategy by industrial scientists. Here we describe an electrochemical C–H oxidation strategy that exhibits broad substrate scope, operational simplicity and high chemoselectivity. It uses inexpensive and readily available materials, and represents a scalable allylic C–H oxidation (demonstrated on 100 grams), enabling the adoption of this C–H oxidation strategy in large-scale industrial settings without substantial environmental impact.

 
Continuous evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Continuous evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17938

Authors: Ahmed H. Badran, Victor M. Guzov, Qing Huai, Melissa M. Kemp, Prashanth Vishwanath, Wendy Kain, Autumn M. Nance, Artem Evdokimov, Farhad Moshiri, Keith H. Turner, Ping Wang, Thomas Malvar & David R. Liu

The Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins (Bt toxins) are widely used insecticidal proteins in engineered crops that provide agricultural, economic, and environmental benefits. The development of insect resistance to Bt toxins endangers their long-term effectiveness. Here we have developed a phage-assisted continuous evolution selection that rapidly

 
Cell biology: Ubiquitination without E1 and E2 enzymes
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Cell biology: Ubiquitination without E1 and E2 enzymes

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17888

Authors: Sagar Bhogaraju & Ivan Dikic

A protein in the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila has been found to attach the modifying molecule ubiquitin to human proteins, using a mechanism that, surprisingly, does not involve cellular E1 and E2 enzymes. See Letter p.120

 
Materials science: Clockwork at the atomic scale
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Materials science: Clockwork at the atomic scale

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17890

Authors: Marjana Ležaić

Design rules for exotic materials known as polar metals have been put into practice in thin films. The findings will motivate studies of how a phenomenon called screening can be manipulated to generate new phases in metals. See Letter p.68

 
China: Building an innovator
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

China: Building an innovator

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S32a

Author: Nicky Phillips

When it comes to translating its own research into practical applications, China falls short. A forum in Shanghai put the spotlight on ambitious plans to accelerate the process.

 
Technology transfer: The leap to industry
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Technology transfer: The leap to industry

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S13a

Author: Jessica Wapner

The science done in university laboratories can change the world, but only when discoveries can be transformed into innovations.

 
The Museum of Nothing
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

The Museum of Nothing

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533138a

Author: Anna Zumbro

But is it art?

 
Industry: Shared goals score reproducible results
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Industry: Shared goals score reproducible results

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533036d

Author: Eric Buenz

As every manager knows, the goals of the employee and the organization must be aligned for success (A.EdwardsNature531, 299–301; 10.1038/531299a2016). In my experience of industry and academic research, there is no such driver in academia.

 
Physics: Material to meaning
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Physics: Material to meaning

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533034a

Author: Robert P. Crease

Robert P. Crease assesses Sean Carroll's attempt to construct morality out of quantum field theory.

 
Nine years of censorship
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Nine years of censorship

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533026a

Author: Lesley Evans Ogden

Canadian scientists are now allowed to speak out about their work — and the government policy that had restricted communications.

 
Software error doomed Japanese Hitomi spacecraft
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Software error doomed Japanese Hitomi spacecraft

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature.2016.19835

Author: Alexandra Witze

Space agency declares the astronomy satellite a loss.

 
Environmental science: UK food imports use scarce water
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Environmental science: UK food imports use scarce water

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011f

Half of the United Kingdom's global water footprint is unsustainable.Arjen Hoekstra and Mesfin Mekonnen of the University of Twente in the Netherlands quantified UK water consumption and found that the country uses roughly 5.5 billion cubic metres of surface and groundwater per year. About

 
Planetary science: Martian water on the boil
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Planetary science: Martian water on the boil

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011b

Water boiling under Mars's thin atmosphere could explain some of the planet's puzzling geological features, such as gullies (pictured) and hillside streaks, which some scientists have attributed to liquid water flowing today.A team led by Marion Massé of the University of Nantes

 
Climate change: Knowledge alters public perception
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Climate change: Knowledge alters public perception

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533010b

An awareness of the causes of climate change, rather than its consequences or physical characteristics, can increase the public's concern about global warming.Past studies have suggested that values are more important than knowledge in influencing public perception about climate-change risks. Jing Shi of the

 
The nuclear option
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

The nuclear option

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533007b

China is vigorously promoting nuclear energy, but its pursuit of reprocessing is misguided.

 
Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17668

Authors: Libin Ye, Ned Van Eps, Marco Zimmer, Oliver P. Ernst & R. Scott Prosser

 
Crystal structure of the human sterol transporter ABCG5/ABCG8
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17666

Authors: Jyh-Yeuan Lee, Lisa N. Kinch, Dominika M. Borek, Jin Wang, Junmei Wang, Ina L. Urbatsch, Xiao-Song Xie, Nikolai V. Grishin, Jonathan C. Cohen, Zbyszek Otwinowski, Helen H. Hobbs & Daniel M. Rosenbaum

ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters play critical roles in maintaining sterol balance in higher eukaryotes. The ABCG5/ABCG8 heterodimer (G5G8) mediates excretion of neutral sterols in liver and intestines. Mutations disrupting G5G8 cause sitosterolaemia, a disorder characterized by sterol accumulation and premature atherosclerosis. Here we use crystallization in lipid bilayers to determine the X-ray structure of human G5G8 in a nucleotide-free state at 3.9 Å resolution, generating the first atomic model of an ABC sterol transporter. The structure reveals a new transmembrane fold that is present in a large and functionally diverse superfamily of ABC transporters. The transmembrane domains are coupled to the nucleotide-binding sites by networks of interactions that differ between the active and inactive ATPases, reflecting the catalytic asymmetry of the transporter. The G5G8 structure provides a mechanistic framework for understanding sterol transport and the disruptive effects of mutations causing sitosterolaemia.

 
Sex-specific pruning of neuronal synapses in Caenorhabditis elegans
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17977

Authors: Meital Oren-Suissa, Emily A. Bayer & Oliver Hobert

 
Celestial mechanics: Fresh solutions to the four-body problem
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17896

Author: Douglas P. Hamilton

Describing the motion of three or more bodies under the influence of gravity is one of the toughest problems in astronomy. The report of solutions to a large subclass of the four-body problem is truly remarkable.

 
Why That Actually Could Be Rafael Cruz With Lee Harvey Oswald
2016-05-04 13:14:30 (4 minutes ago) 

Earlier this week, the National Enquirer published a groundbreaking investigation that would prove fatal to the Ted Cruz campaign: TED CRUZ FATHER LINKED TO JFK ASSASSINATION. But is any of it true? After an exhaustive investigation of our own, Gawker has concluded that, sure, why not!

Read more...

 
5 takeaways from Donald Trump triumph in Indiana
2016-05-04 13:14:05 (4 minutes ago) 

Donald Trump looked so proud of himself after sweeping Indiana into his win column, you'd have thought he won the Miss Universe crown, too.

Who can blame Donald for gloating?

He has every right to say: I told you so. I told you I could be president. I told you I could shoot someone in the head...

 
Leicester's players will stay - Hartson
2016-05-04 13:10:30 (8 minutes ago) 
Champions Leicester's team will stay together next season to "do something special", says former Wales striker John Hartson.
 
APNewsBreak: Woman's body rejecting face transplant
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) -- The Connecticut woman who underwent a face transplant five years ago after being attacked by a chimpanzee is back in a Boston hospital after doctors discovered her body is rejecting the transplant....
 
AP sources: Kasich to end bid for Republican nomination
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- The last man standing in Donald Trump's path to the Republican nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich will end his campaign Wednesday, making Trump the party's presumptive nominee....
 
AP sources: Kasich to end bid for Republican nomination
2016-05-04 13:10:26 (8 minutes ago) 
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- The last man standing in Donald Trump's path to the Republican nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich will end his campaign Wednesday, making Trump the party's presumptive nominee....
 
Man assaults friend with chemical spray at mall
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

TOWSON, Md. (AP) — Maryland officials say a 20-year-old man assaulted a friend with a chemical spray at a mall. Officials said in a statement Wednesday that police and fire personnel were called to Towson Town Center in Baltimore County on Tuesday night for a possible chemical irritant in the mall. Officials say the spray […]
 
Man assaults friend with chemical spray at mall
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

TOWSON, Md. (AP) — Maryland officials say a 20-year-old man assaulted a friend with a chemical spray at a mall. Officials said in a statement Wednesday that police and fire personnel were called to Towson Town Center in Baltimore County on Tuesday night for a possible chemical irritant in the mall. Officials say the spray […]
 
Robber is shortchanged after coming away with only 35 cents
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — New Orleans police are investigating an armed robbery of two men where the assailant walked away with only 35 cents. Police say the robbery happened Wednesday morning in the city’s Carrollton area. Police said that a 33-year-old man and a 29-year-old man were robbed by a man armed with a semi-automatic […]
 
Scientists break record for keeping lab-grown human embryos alive
2016-05-04 13:05:31 (13 minutes ago) 
 
The Latest: Inmate advocate decries transfer of inmates
2016-05-04 13:05:21 (13 minutes ago) 
 
Beer Goggles: U.S. craft beer can learn from Belgium’s legendary breweries
2016-05-04 13:04:37 (14 minutes ago) 
While America is greatly influencing the Netherlands, Belgium still has a lot to teach us, says Jason Notte.
 
15 Million Degrees: A Journey to the Centre of the Sun by Lucie Green – review
2016-05-04 13:04:16 (14 minutes ago) 
 
Your Music Hall memories
2016-05-04 13:03:54 (15 minutes ago) 

From relatives who helped build Music Hall to memories of big stars, local residents connect to Music Hall in many ways.

        
 
Watch: Detroit Teachers Shut Down Schools for Second Day Over Lack of Pay
2016-05-04 13:00:15 (18 minutes ago) 
A lack of funds means the city have enough money to pay its teachers. And it's shutting off water to up to 20,000 residents behind on their utility bill.

It’s illegal for teachers to go on strike in Michigan—so, by the hundreds they began calling in sick Monday—after city officials said they might not get paid because the cash-strapped city will soon run out of money to pay its employees.

But this isn’t the only crisis the city is facing right now. Officials say a lack of funds has also spurred the city to start cutting off water to up to 20,000 who are behind on payments. 

Governor Rick Snyder criticized the sick-outs. “That’s not a constructive act to getting legislation done,” the governor told The Detroit News.

Watch: Detroit Teachers share devastating stories during rally

 Related Stories9 Arrested in Seattle After May Day Protesters Clash With PoliceUS Black and Latino Workers Exploited, Receive Less BenefitsTeachers Look to Unionize at Another New Orleans Charter School
 
Energy Company: California Gas Leak to Cost $665 Million, More Than Double Earlier Estimates
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
Energy company: California gas leak to cost $665 million, more than double earlier estimates
 
John Kasich’s Star Wars tribute proclaimed him 'only hope' to beat Clinton
2016-05-04 12:56:09 (22 minutes ago) 

Is John Kasich the Obi-Wan of the Republican party?

       
 
Hidden chapter of Sept. 11 could be revealed with release of classified pages
2016-05-04 12:55:56 (23 minutes ago) 
adcelannotate = {"mobilepaywallcategory" : "MOBILE_PREM-NATIONAL_WORLD","nativepaywallcategory" : "NATIVE_PREM-NATIONAL_WORLD"};President Barack Obama has hinted that at least portions of the 28 pages may be released shortly amid growing calls to reveal what some see as a hidden chapter in the explanation of Sept. 11.
 
John Kasich To Drop Out, Leaving Trump as GOP Nominee
2016-05-04 12:55:48 (23 minutes ago) 
Multiple outlets are reporting that Ohio Gov. John Kasich plans to suspend his run to be the GOP presidential nominee. The move, if happens, would make Donald Trump the presumptive nominee for the GOP. The report comes hours after Kasich abruptly cancelled a planned press conference (could be paywalled; alternate source) in Virginia on Wednesday morning. LA Times reports: Kasich, the Ohio governor, had pledged to continue campaigning as a Trump alternative who could deny the billionaire needed delegates. But on Wednesday, he canceled a news conference in Washington and planned an announcement for later in the day in Columbus, Ohio, to drop out. Vox has more details.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

 
EU internal border checks to stay in place
2016-05-04 12:55:27 (23 minutes ago) 
The EU commission recommended extending internal checks for five EU states for another six months. The final decision will be made by the Council, representing member states.
 
Atlanta airport to close 1 of 3 security areas for 3 weeks
2016-05-04 12:54:42 (24 minutes ago) 
New automated screening equipment being installed in the domestic terminal of the world's busiest airport
 
French tourist dies while snorkeling off Key Largo
2016-05-04 12:53:55 (25 minutes ago) 

Authorities say a 55-year-old French tourist died while snorkeling in the Florida Keys.

Monroe County Sheriff's spokeswoman Becky Herrin says Catherin Gray Molay of Paris was with her tour group at Grecian Rocks off the Key Largo coast on Tuesday afternoon when she surfaced without a mask.

She...

 
Dig this Star Wars Disco from 1977, and May the Fourth be with you
2016-05-04 12:50:21 (28 minutes ago) 

From the classic Meco album, Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk (1977).

 
International Drone Day is coming, even to the restricted skies of DC*
2016-05-04 12:50:19 (28 minutes ago) 

Did you know that International Drone Day was a thing? It is, and the next one happens on Saturday, May 7. Organized under the slogan "Drones are good," model aeronautics clubs across the country are hosting events to show the world the good side of their hobby. Celebrations are even taking place in the Washington, DC region—home to some of the least-hospitable skies for unmanned aerial vehicles.

Twenty different UAV clubs are holding events on Saturday, including several that were grounded as recently as February. DC's airspace has been subject to a 30-mile "Special Flight Rules Area" ever since 9/11, split into inner and outer zones. All UAVs are banned within the inner 15-mile zone, a restriction that companies are hard-coding into drone firmware. But in December 2015, the FAA closed the entire zone to all drone traffic, effectively shuttering 14 area flying clubs.

However, the clubs and the FAA were able to resolve their differences by February, when revised rules for the region were put into place. Drones and other unmanned aircraft can take to the skies above DC's outer suburbs once again, as long as they weigh under 55lbs (30kg) and remain below 400 feet (121m), among other restrictions.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
Miller Grove's Sharman White interviews at Georgia State
2016-05-04 13:16:17 (2 minutes ago) 
 
Party drug hope for depression
2016-05-04 13:16:04 (2 minutes ago) 
A popular party drug and horse tranquilliser could be harnessed as a safe and potent antidepressant, says scientists.
 
Destructive Wildfire near Canada's Oil Sands May Have Been Fueled by Global Warming
2016-05-04 13:15:52 (3 minutes ago) 
 
Having an overactive immune system may prime you for depression
2016-05-04 13:15:02 (4 minutes ago) 
Blood tests could help doctors identify people who are at risk of severe depressive episodes, and enable them to tailor more effective treatments
 
Corrigendum: Dissecting a circuit for olfactory behaviour in Caenorhabditis elegans
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Corrigendum: Dissecting a circuit for olfactory behaviour in Caenorhabditis elegans

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature16515

Authors: Sreekanth H. Chalasani, Nikos Chronis, Makoto Tsunozaki, Jesse M. Gray, Daniel Ramot, Miriam B. Goodman & Cornelia I. Bargmann

Nature450, 63–70 (2007); doi:10.1038/nature06292corrigendum Nature451, 102 (2008); doi:10.1038/nature06540We have discovered that Figs 1, 2, 3 and 5 and Supplementary Figs 1–5 and 7 of this Article were generated from

 
EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17947

Authors: Jianhua Li, Erick Lu, Tangsheng Yi & Jason G. Cyster

T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation.

 
Topology of ON and OFF inputs in visual cortex enables an invariant columnar architecture
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Topology of ON and OFF inputs in visual cortex enables an invariant columnar architecture

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17941

Authors: Kuo-Sheng Lee, Xiaoying Huang & David Fitzpatrick

Circuits in the visual cortex integrate the information derived from separate ON (light-responsive) and OFF (dark-responsive) pathways to construct orderly columnar representations of stimulus orientation and visual space. How this transformation is achieved to meet the specific topographic constraints of each representation remains unclear. Here we report several novel features of ON–OFF convergence visualized by mapping the receptive fields of layer 2/3 neurons in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) visual cortex using two-photon imaging of GCaMP6 calcium signals. We show that the spatially separate ON and OFF subfields of simple cells in layer 2/3 exhibit topologically distinct relationships with the maps of visual space and orientation preference. The centres of OFF subfields for neurons in a given region of cortex are confined to a compact region of visual space and display a smooth visuotopic progression. By contrast, the centres of the ON subfields are distributed over a wider region of visual space, display substantial visuotopic scatter, and have an orientation-specific displacement consistent with orientation preference map structure. As a result, cortical columns exhibit an invariant aggregate receptive field structure: an OFF-dominated central region flanked by ON-dominated subfields. This distinct arrangement of ON and OFF inputs enables continuity in the mapping of both orientation and visual space and the generation of a columnar map of absolute spatial phase.

 
Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17439

Authors: Paul Raccuglia, Katherine C. Elbert, Philip D. F. Adler, Casey Falk, Malia B. Wenny, Aurelio Mollo, Matthias Zeller, Sorelle A. Friedler, Joshua Schrier & Alexander J. Norquist

Inorganic–organic hybrid materials such as organically templated metal oxides, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) and organohalide perovskites have been studied for decades, and hydrothermal and (non-aqueous) solvothermal syntheses have produced thousands of new materials that collectively contain nearly all the metals in the periodic table. Nevertheless, the formation of these compounds is not fully understood, and development of new compounds relies primarily on exploratory syntheses. Simulation- and data-driven approaches (promoted by efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative) provide an alternative to experimental trial-and-error. Three major strategies are: simulation-based predictions of physical properties (for example, charge mobility, photovoltaic properties, gas adsorption capacity or lithium-ion intercalation) to identify promising target candidates for synthetic efforts; determination of the structure–property relationship from large bodies of experimental data, enabled by integration with high-throughput synthesis and measurement tools; and clustering on the basis of similar crystallographic structure (for example, zeolite structure classification or gas adsorption properties). Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that uses machine-learning algorithms trained on reaction data to predict reaction outcomes for the crystallization of templated vanadium selenites. We used information on ‘dark’ reactions—failed or unsuccessful hydrothermal syntheses—collected from archived laboratory notebooks from our laboratory, and added physicochemical property descriptions to the raw notebook information using cheminformatics techniques. We used the resulting data to train a machine-learning model to predict reaction success. When carrying out hydrothermal synthesis experiments using previously untested, commercially available organic building blocks, our machine-learning model outperformed traditional human strategies, and successfully predicted conditions for new organically templated inorganic product formation with a success rate of 89 per cent. Inverting the machine-learning model reveals new hypotheses regarding the conditions for successful product formation.

 
Principles underlying sensory map topography in primary visual cortex
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Principles underlying sensory map topography in primary visual cortex

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17936

Authors: Jens Kremkow, Jianzhong Jin, Yushi Wang & Jose M. Alonso

The primary visual cortex contains a detailed map of the visual scene, which is represented according to multiple stimulus dimensions including spatial location, ocular dominance and stimulus orientation. The maps for spatial location and ocular dominance arise from the spatial arrangement of thalamic afferent axons

 
Immunology: Mum's microbes boost baby's immunity
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Immunology: Mum's microbes boost baby's immunity

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17895

Authors: Mihir Pendse & Lora V. Hooper

The microorganisms that colonize pregnant mice have been shown to prime the innate immune system in newborn offspring, preparing them for life in association with microbes.

 
Q&A: Helga Nowotny
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Q&A: Helga Nowotny

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S47a

Author: Chelsea Wald

Austrian social scientist Helga Nowotny was president of the European Research Council between 2010 and 2013. Now a professor emerita of ETH Zurich and author of The Cunning of Uncertainty (Polity, 2015), Nowotny discusses the growing pressure to capitalize on academic research, and how countries can get it right in the absence of a universal recipe.

 
Q&A: Horst Domdey
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Q&A: Horst Domdey

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S30a

Author: Chelsea Wald

After starting one of Germany's first biotech companies, biochemist Horst Domdey co-founded BioM, a non-profit organization that has managed and developed Munich's biotechnology cluster since 1997. He talks to Nature about nurturing the entrepreneurial spirit in “a country of competitions”.

 
Start-ups: A sense of enterprise
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Start-ups: A sense of enterprise

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S10a

Author: Neil Savage

Universities aid entrepreneurs by helping them to turn their research into companies. In return, universities can reap financial benefits.

 
Academies: Diversity drive
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Academies: Diversity drive

Nature (2016). doi:10.1038/nj7601-133b

Women are underrepresented in memberships of academic science societies.

 
Conservation: Debate over whale longevity is futile
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Conservation: Debate over whale longevity is futile

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533036c

Author: P. J. Nico de Bruyn

The unquestionable importance of ethical animal husbandry aside, I doubt whether the ongoing dispute over the respective lifespans of captive and wild killer whales (Orcinus orca) will contribute anything to our long-term efforts to save the species (see Nature531, 426–

 
Books in brief
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Books in brief

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533033a

Author: Barbara Kiser

Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

 
Can artificial intelligence create the next wonder material?
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Can artificial intelligence create the next wonder material?

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533022a

Author: Nicola Nosengo

Some researchers believe that machine-learning techniques can revolutionize how materials science is done.

 
Australia softens blow of climate job cuts
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Australia softens blow of climate job cuts

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature.2016.19831

Author: Myles Gough

New research centre at national science agency CSIRO adds 40 jobs, amid hundreds of redundancies.

 
Cancer biology: T cells team up with chemotherapy
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Cancer biology: T cells team up with chemotherapy

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011e

Immune cells called T cells could make some chemotherapies more effective against ovarian cancer.Rebecca Liu and Weiping Zou of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and their colleagues studied human ovarian cancer cells in culture. They showed that fibroblasts — connective-tissue cells found

 
Microbiology: Gut microbes shape immunity
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Microbiology: Gut microbes shape immunity

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011a

Autoimmune disease in children could be caused by gut bacteria that inhibit immune development.Surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is made by microbes such as Escherichia coli and helps immune cells to mature. Ramnik Xavier of Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, and his team studied

 
Biomechanics: Peacocks maximize tail shimmer
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Biomechanics: Peacocks maximize tail shimmer

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533010a

During their elaborate courtship displays, peacocks shake their iridescent tail feathers in an energetically efficient manner.To study the dynamics of the peacock's tail-feather vibrations, Roslyn Dakin at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, Suzanne Amador Kane at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and their

 
Lessons from the Ancient One
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Lessons from the Ancient One

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533007a

The final stages of a dispute over an ancient Native American skeleton signal the need for clearer oversight of such human remains.

 
Continuous probing of cold complex molecules with infrared frequency comb spectroscopy
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17440

Authors: Ben Spaun, P. Bryan Changala, David Patterson, Bryce J. Bjork, Oliver H. Heckl, John M. Doyle & Jun Ye

For more than half a century, high-resolution infrared spectroscopy has played a crucial role in probing molecular structure and dynamics. Such studies have so far been largely restricted to relatively small and simple systems, because at room temperature even molecules of modest size already occupy many millions of rotational/vibrational states, yielding highly congested spectra that are difficult to assign. Targeting more complex molecules requires methods that can record broadband infrared spectra (that is, spanning multiple vibrational bands) with both high resolution and high sensitivity. However, infrared spectroscopic techniques have hitherto been limited either by narrow bandwidth and long acquisition time, or by low sensitivity and resolution. Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) combines the inherent broad bandwidth and high resolution of an optical frequency comb with the high detection sensitivity provided by a high-finesse enhancement cavity, but it still suffers from spectral congestion. Here we show that this problem can be overcome by using buffer gas cooling to produce continuous, cold samples of molecules that are then subjected to CE-DFCS. This integration allows us to acquire a rotationally resolved direct absorption spectrum in the C–H stretching region of nitromethane, a model system that challenges our understanding of large-amplitude vibrational motion. We have also used this technique on several large organic molecules that are of fundamental spectroscopic and astrochemical relevance, including naphthalene, adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. These findings establish the value of our approach for studying much larger and more complex molecules than have been probed so far, enabling complex molecules and their kinetics to be studied with orders-of-magnitude improvements in efficiency, spectral resolution and specificity.

 
Self-organization of the in vitro attached human embryo
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17948

Authors: Alessia Deglincerti, Gist F. Croft, Lauren N. Pietila, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, Eric D. Siggia & Ali H. Brivanlou

Implantation of the blastocyst is a developmental milestone in mammalian embryonic development. At this time, a coordinated program of lineage diversification, cell-fate specification, and morphogenetic movements establishes the generation of extra-embryonic tissues and the embryo proper, and determines the conditions for successful pregnancy and gastrulation. Despite its basic and clinical importance, this process remains mysterious in humans. Here we report the use of a novel in vitro system to study the post-implantation development of the human embryo. We unveil the self-organizing abilities and autonomy of in vitro attached human embryos. We find human-specific molecular signatures of early cell lineage, timing, and architecture. Embryos display key landmarks of normal development, including epiblast expansion, lineage segregation, bi-laminar disc formation, amniotic and yolk sac cavitation, and trophoblast diversification. Our findings highlight the species-specificity of these developmental events and provide a new understanding of early human embryonic development beyond the blastocyst stage. In addition, our study establishes a new model system relevant to early human pregnancy loss. Finally, our work will also assist in the rational design of differentiation protocols of human embryonic stem cells to specific cell types for disease modelling and cell replacement therapy.

 
Human embryology: Implantation barrier overcome
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17894

Author: Janet Rossant

The early stages of human development are normally hidden within the womb, but improved techniques for culturing embryos from the blastocyst stage promise to make these steps easier to investigate.

 
NBC News Special Report: Kasich Suspending Campaign
2016-05-04 13:14:53 (4 minutes ago) 
NBC News' Lester Holt and Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd discuss Republican presidential candidate John Kasich reportedly suspending his 201
 
Fort McMurray Wildfire: How Warming Fits In
2016-05-04 13:14:24 (4 minutes ago) 
Climate change is making wildfires like the one raging in Fort McMurray, Alberta more common. Continue reading →
 
Ben Hatke, kids' author and superhero
2016-05-04 13:10:31 (8 minutes ago) 

You'll know Ben Hatke as author of Boing Boing-beloved illustrated kids' books like Little Robot and Zita the Space Girl, but as this Children's Book Week video shows, Hatke is a literal fire-breathing, acrobatic, sword-fighting superhero! (more…)

 
Tindall eyes 'amazing' Olympic call-up
2016-05-04 13:10:30 (8 minutes ago) 
Zara Tindall will look to stake a claim for Olympic selection at the Badminton Horse Trials, which begin on Thursday.
 
Air bag inflator recall to grow by 35 million to 40 million
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
DETROIT (AP) -- Takata has agreed to recall another 35 million to 40 million air bag inflators, a stunning increase that will more than double what already is the largest automotive recall in American history....
 
Air bag inflator recall to grow by 35 million to 40 million
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
DETROIT (AP) - Takata has agreed to recall another 35 million to 40 million air bag inflators, a stunning increase that will more than double what already is the largest automotive recall in American history. The recall expansion would bring to as many as 69 million the total number of inflators to be replaced, a task that will take until the end of 2019 to complete, according to a government news release obtained by The Associated Press. The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administrat...
 
The Latest: Opponents begin fight against pot initiative
2016-05-04 13:10:25 (8 minutes ago) 
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The Latest on a marijuana legalization initiative proposed for the November ballot (all times local):...
 
Cost estimate of Los Angeles-area gas leak hits $665 million
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An energy company says expected costs from a massive gas leak near Los Angeles have ballooned to $665 million. Sempra Energy released the estimate in an earnings report Wednesday. Southern California Gas Co., which is owned by Sempra, had estimated costs of $250 million to $300 million. That figure didn’t include […]
 
Washington Supreme Court to hear cases at CWU Thursday
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

The state Supreme Court will be traveling to Ellensburg to hear cases at Central Washington University on Thursday.
 
APNewsBreak: Woman’s body rejecting face transplant
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Connecticut woman who underwent a face transplant five years ago after being attacked by a chimpanzee is back in a Boston hospital after doctors discovered her body is rejecting the transplant. Charla Nash says doctors have decided to end an experimental drug treatment and put her back on her original […]
 
Port Elizabeth offers Blues perfect chance to amend horror away record
2016-05-04 13:05:21 (13 minutes ago) 
The Blues won't get a better chance to break their away duck this season.
 
The Latest: Opponents begin fight against pot initiative
2016-05-04 13:05:21 (13 minutes ago) 
 
Government U-turn on unaccompanied refugee children welcomed by MPs
2016-05-04 13:04:18 (14 minutes ago) 
 
This lucky tortoise lives in his own mini Jurassic Park - CNET
2016-05-04 13:03:55 (15 minutes ago) 
Move over, T. rex. There's a new dino in town and he sports a beak, a shell and a dedication to the slow-food movement.
 
Navy SEAL killed in Iraq was trying to rescue others
2016-05-04 13:03:53 (15 minutes ago) 
 
Full Episode: GMA 05/04/16: Cruz Suspends Campaign, Presidential Race Pivots to General Election
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
How to Protect Yourself Against the Zika Virus; 'Captain America: Civil War' Stars Surprise 'GMA' Audience
 
Man Assaults Friend With Chemical Spray at Mall
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
Baltimore County officials say a 20-year-old man assaulted a friend with a chemical spray at Towson Town Center
 
Election 2016: Let's Drop Acid and Have a Presidential Race
2016-05-04 12:56:08 (22 minutes ago) 

Sen. Ted Cruz leaves the stage after ending his presidential campaign at a primary night rally in Indianapolis, May 3, 2016. (Photo: Eric Thayer / The New York Times)

Kasich is gone. Carly Fiorina was a vice presidential nominee for six days while Donald Trump accused Ted Cruz's father of having a hand in the murder of John F. Kennedy before declaring on national television that he was going to win "bigly." That's right, "bigly." Bernie Sanders still has some fight in him, but the Trump v. Clinton contest is taking shape, and it is gruesomely likely that we're all going to lose bigly when the deal goes down.

Sen. Ted Cruz leaves the stage after ending his presidential campaign at a primary night rally in Indianapolis, May 3, 2016. (Photo: Eric Thayer / The New York Times)

When the bent roadshow that is this 2016 presidential election season kicked off months ago -- comprised of 17 gremlins, a Republican Democrat and a democratic socialist from the woods all running for the prize like the ingredients for the worst fruitcake you've ever heard of -- I said to myself, "Yeah, OK, get ready, because this one is going to be really, really weird." I bought a helmet, a mouth guard, and installed four-point NASCAR-approved restraints in my office chair. I thought I was ready. Just another campaign season, right? Stomp the gas, let's do this.

My safety precautions served me well through those ridiculous GOP debates, through primary and caucus and absurdity after absurdity, but none of it helped after I crashed into the Indiana primary. When Donald Trump on Tuesday accused Ted Cruz's father of involvement in the John F. Kennedy assassination based on a "report" by the National Enquirer, my finely tuned race car hit the wall at speed, rolled over twelve times and burst into flames. I was thankfully thrown free and landed softly in a hedgerow, but a part of me will always be in that burning car wondering how in the blue hell I got there.

For more original Truthout election coverage, check out our election section, "Beyond the Sound Bites: Election 2016."

Here's the funny part: Trump won Indiana by 17 points, and Ted Cruz dropped out. On planet Earth, where I thought I was until yesterday, accusing someone's father of helping to assassinate a president would be grounds for immediate disqualification, not fodder for double-digit domination that all but seals the Republican nomination. Unless Godzilla rises from the sea and devours the North American continent, Donald fa-chrissakes Trump is going to win this thing in a rout. John Kasich got 8 percent of the vote in Indiana and literally went to bed. No statement, nothing. If Kasich kept up this anti-frenetic pace, you'd start seeing his face on milk cartons at the supermarket. "Have you seen me?" No. It's over. He just dropped out.

In a season as bizarre as this has been, the fact that I found myself having a grudging respect for Ted Cruz is certainly the strangest part of all. Make no mistake: I consider Cruz dropping out of the presidential race to be the equivalent of an extinction-level-event meteor narrowly missing the planet. Trump is genuinely dangerous, but he is at the end of the day a carnival barker with a flat head. He is a certain menace, but Cruz means what he says, and his gift for rhetoric could have delivered us into a new Dark Age. Trump is ridiculous, but Cruz is a truly frightening Dominionist demagogue who has no business even looking at the White House, much less residing in it. He is not a monster, but he would become one if given the chance.

All that being said, Cruz left everything on the field in Indiana -- his confrontation with those Trump supporters when he effectively shut them down, his pure rage against Trump after the Kennedy assassination thing hit the wires -- and it tells me he's not done seeking the presidency. That spooks me, but you have to give credit where it is due. The man went down swinging. I'm reminded of the line by Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in the film Full Metal Jacket: "He's silly and he's ignorant but he's got guts, and guts is enough." The 2020 election season is a scant four years away. Cruz is silly and he's ignorant, and he'll be back. Take appropriate precautions.

While the mayhem of the GOP nomination race ratcheted up to a whole new level of farce, a funny thing happened on the way to the coronation of Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee. Her chariot hit a Bernie-shaped speed bump south of Gary and cracked an axle. Bernie Sanders, who can't win according to the television people, won Indiana, and in fairly decisive fashion.

Sanders gave a muted, calm victory statement as he prepared to move on to next week's contests in Nebraska and West Virginia. Clinton, on the other hand, went dark and silent like a deep-diving submarine. No statement to her supporters, just like Kasich. It's almost as if she was never there. What's that phrase submariners use? Make like a hole in the water. Indeed.

Conventional wisdom and the delegate math has Hillary Clinton winning the nomination, but Bernie Sanders hasn't gotten that particular memo. After Nebraska and West Virginia comes Kentucky and Oregon, followed by Washington State, followed after that by delegate-rich California, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota and South Dakota all on the 7th of June. Indiana proved that anything is possible. The media wants a Trump v. Clinton contest for obvious reasons. Sanders has other ideas.

This is truly the Let's All Drop Acid and Have a Presidential Race campaign season. Kasich is gone with a whimper. Carly Fiorina was a vice presidential nominee for six days while Donald Trump accused Ted Cruz's father of having a hand in the murder of John F. Kennedy before declaring on national television that he was going to win "bigly." That's right, "bigly." My new favorite word to describe this race; it means nothing, and everything. Bernie Sanders still has some fight in him, but the Trump v. Clinton contest is taking shape, and it is gruesomely likely that we're all going to lose bigly when the deal goes down.

Thanks, Indiana. I can see the music.

 
Man sent to prison for fatal crash that killed mother, daughter
2016-05-04 12:55:55 (23 minutes ago) 
adcelannotate = {"mobilepaywallcategory" : "MOBILE_PREM-LOCAL","nativepaywallcategory" : "NATIVE_PREM-LOCAL"};A 24-year-old Northeast Side man was sentenced today to 20 years in prison for causing a crash, while high on marijuana, that killed a mother and daughter and injured two others.
 
Mentor man running as Other Party candidate for county commissioner seat
2016-05-04 12:55:43 (23 minutes ago) 

A Mentor man is running for the Lake County commissioners seat in November currently occupied by Democrat Kevin Malecek.

Danny Tharp, 56, is running as an Other Party candidate in the Nov. 8 race.

Tharp is a 1977 graduate of Perry High School. He was employed through Labor Union Local 496 from 1978 to 1991 and was employed by Perry Schools from 1991 to 2008.

 
150-Pound Wild Boar Attacks Couple on Massachusetts Farm
2016-05-04 12:54:53 (24 minutes ago) 
 
Roaming gator tries to ring doorbell of South Carolina home
2016-05-04 12:54:25 (24 minutes ago) 
An alligator wandered through a subdivision in Moncks Corner near Charleston this week and at one point wandered onto the front porch of a house and climbed up the front door. Barkley tells local media that alligators have visited the neighborhood before and last year she saw one on the front porch of another neighbor's house.
 
LeBron addresses possibility of facing Wade, Heat in East finals
2016-05-04 12:53:55 (25 minutes ago) 

It has been a focus of many since the NBA playoff bracket was settled: LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers against Dwyane Wade and the Miami Heat in the Eastern Conference finals.

It only took one game in each series for it to be raised by one of the leading protagonists.

So before his Cavaliers...

 
'Knotted gun' sculptor dies aged 81
2016-05-04 12:50:20 (28 minutes ago) 
Carl Fredrik Reutersward, one of Sweden's best-known modern artists, dies at the age of 81.
 
APNewsBreak: New rule would permit thousands of eagle deaths
2016-05-04 12:50:17 (28 minutes ago) 
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Obama administration is revising a federal rule that allows wind-energy companies to operate high-speed turbines for up to 30 years, even if means killing or injuring thousands of federally protected bald and golden eagles....
 
Metro Atlanta's 10 most consistently awful traffic hotspots
2016-05-04 13:16:17 (2 minutes ago) 
 
Baker Won’t Vote for Trump
2016-05-04 13:16:01 (3 minutes ago) 

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker (R) has reiterated that he will not vote for Donald Trump in November, the Boston Globe reports.

Baker also said he ‘‘sincerely doubts’’ he would vote for Hillary Clinton, the likely Democratic nominee.

Washington Post: Some anti-Trump Republicans say, “I’m with her.”

 
EU says Turkey almost ready for visa-free access
2016-05-04 13:15:35 (3 minutes ago) 
First visa-free Turkish visitors to EU possible on 1 July if Turkey meets five more criteria on time. Most Turkish people to face long wait for EU-compliant biometric passports.
 
New exoplanet trio may have been dried out by fiery young star
2016-05-04 13:15:02 (4 minutes ago) 
Three recently discovered nearby exoplanets may not be as habitable as they first looked, as their hot young star could have left them high and dry
 
Efficient introduction of specific homozygous and heterozygous mutations using CRISPR/Cas9
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Efficient introduction of specific homozygous and heterozygous mutations using CRISPR/Cas9

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17664

Authors: Dominik Paquet, Dylan Kwart, Antonia Chen, Andrew Sproul, Samson Jacob, Shaun Teo, Kimberly Moore Olsen, Andrew Gregg, Scott Noggle & Marc Tessier-Lavigne

The bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system allows sequence-specific gene editing in many organisms and holds promise as a tool to generate models of human diseases, for example, in human pluripotent stem cells. CRISPR/Cas9 introduces targeted double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with high efficiency, which are typically repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) resulting in nonspecific insertions, deletions or other mutations (indels). DSBs may also be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) using a DNA repair template, such as an introduced single-stranded oligo DNA nucleotide (ssODN), allowing knock-in of specific mutations. Although CRISPR/Cas9 is used extensively to engineer gene knockouts through NHEJ, editing by HDR remains inefficient and can be corrupted by additional indels, preventing its widespread use for modelling genetic disorders through introducing disease-associated mutations. Furthermore, targeted mutational knock-in at single alleles to model diseases caused by heterozygous mutations has not been reported. Here we describe a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing framework that allows selective introduction of mono- and bi-allelic sequence changes with high efficiency and accuracy. We show that HDR accuracy is increased dramatically by incorporating silent CRISPR/Cas-blocking mutations along with pathogenic mutations, and establish a method termed ‘CORRECT’ for scarless genome editing. By characterizing and exploiting a stereotyped inverse relationship between a mutation’s incorporation rate and its distance to the DSB, we achieve predictable control of zygosity. Homozygous introduction requires a guide RNA targeting close to the intended mutation, whereas heterozygous introduction can be accomplished by distance-dependent suboptimal mutation incorporation or by use of mixed repair templates. Using this approach, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells with heterozygous and homozygous dominant early onset Alzheimer’s disease-causing mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1M146V) and derived cortical neurons, which displayed genotype-dependent disease-associated phenotypes. Our findings enable efficient introduction of specific sequence changes with CRISPR/Cas9, facilitating study of human disease.

 
A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17677

Authors: Rajeev Gautam, Yoshiaki Nishimura, Amarendra Pegu, Martha C. Nason, Florian Klein, Anna Gazumyan, Jovana Golijanin, Alicia Buckler-White, Reza Sadjadpour, Keyun Wang, Zachary Mankoff, Stephen D. Schmidt, Jeffrey D. Lifson, John R. Mascola, Michel C. Nussenzweig & Malcolm A. Martin

Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg−1) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission.

 
The genetic program for cartilage development has deep homology within Bilateria
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

The genetic program for cartilage development has deep homology within Bilateria

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17398

Authors: Oscar A. Tarazona, Leslie A. Slota, Davys H. Lopez, GuangJun Zhang & Martin J. Cohn

The evolution of novel cell types led to the emergence of new tissues and organs during the diversification of animals. The origin of the chondrocyte, the cell type that synthesizes cartilage matrix, was central to the evolution of the vertebrate endoskeleton. Cartilage-like tissues also exist outside the vertebrates, although their relationship to vertebrate cartilage is enigmatic. Here we show that protostome and deuterostome cartilage share structural and chemical properties, and that the mechanisms of cartilage development are extensively conserved—from induction of chondroprogenitor cells by Hedgehog and β-catenin signalling, to chondrocyte differentiation and matrix synthesis by SoxE and SoxD regulation of clade A fibrillar collagen (ColA) genes—suggesting that the chondrogenic gene regulatory network evolved in the common ancestor of Bilateria. These results reveal deep homology of the genetic program for cartilage development in Bilateria and suggest that activation of this ancient core chondrogenic network underlies the parallel evolution of cartilage tissues in Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia.

 
Polar metals by geometric design
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Polar metals by geometric design

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17628

Authors: T. H. Kim, D. Puggioni, Y. Yuan, L. Xie, H. Zhou, N. Campbell, P. J. Ryan, Y. Choi, J.-W. Kim, J. R. Patzner, S. Ryu, J. P. Podkaminer, J. Irwin, Y. Ma, C. J. Fennie, M. S. Rzchowski, X. Q. Pan, V. Gopalan, J. M. Rondinelli & C. B. Eom

Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

 
Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17669

Authors: Lars von der Wense, Benedict Seiferle, Mustapha Laatiaoui, Jürgen B. Neumayr, Hans-Jörg Maier, Hans-Friedrich Wirth, Christoph Mokry, Jörg Runke, Klaus Eberhardt, Christoph E. Düllmann, Norbert G. Trautmann & Peter G. Thirolf

Today’s most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear

 
Parkinson's disease: Guilt by genetic association
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Parkinson's disease: Guilt by genetic association

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17891

Authors: Asa Abeliovich & Herve Rhinn

Certain sequence variants of the α-synuclein gene are linked to the risk of Parkinson's disease. An analysis of these variants using gene-editing technology provides a possible explanation for this increased risk. See Letter p.95

 
Funding: Donor drugs
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Funding: Donor drugs

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S43a

Author: Cassandra Willyard

For the past decade, venture philanthropists have been working to propel promising therapies and vaccines into the clinic, with some success.

 
Australia: Engagement upgrade
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Australia: Engagement upgrade

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S22a

Author: Bianca Nogrady

The value that Australia places on publication quality over quantity has elevated it into the top echelon of science. Can it now improve its flagging track record in commercialization?

 
Cashing in on science
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Cashing in on science

Nature. doi:10.1038/533S6a

Author: Alla Katsnelson

University research powers innovation and economic development. Countries with intensive research and development (R&D) programmes differ in their approach to turning lab studies into commercial enterprises. By Alla Katsnelson, infographic by Mohamed Ashour.

 
Faculty positions: Tenure figures tumble
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Faculty positions: Tenure figures tumble

Nature (2016). doi:10.1038/nj7601-133a

Academia is moving towards more part-time positions, and fewer tenured ones.

 
Energy policy: Renewables targeted before Fukushima
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Energy policy: Renewables targeted before Fukushima

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533036b

Authors: Aleh Cherp & Jessica Jewell

Masahiro Sugiyama and colleagues write that Japan expanded the role of renewables after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident (Nature531, 29–31; 10.1038/531029a2016). In fact, Japan's targets for renewables were essentially unaffected by the disaster — although the

 
Ethology: Intrepid translator of the hive
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Ethology: Intrepid translator of the hive

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533032a

Author: Mark L. Winston

Mark L. Winston reviews a study of Karl von Frisch, the ethologist who unravelled bee communication.

 
Stem-cell plan aims to bring rhino back from brink of extinction
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Stem-cell plan aims to bring rhino back from brink of extinction

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533020a

Author: Ewen Callaway

Ambitious effort depends on transformation of rhino tissue into sperm and egg cells.

 
Human embryos grown in lab for longer than ever before
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Human embryos grown in lab for longer than ever before

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533015a

Author: Sara Reardon

Embryos cultured for up to 13 days after fertilization open a window into early development.

 
Ecology: Camera traps may aid conservation
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Ecology: Camera traps may aid conservation

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533011d

A study using motion-triggered cameras in the wild has revealed that grasslands and floodplains are home to the most diverse communities of mammals in northern Botswana.Lindsey Rich of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg and her colleagues analysed more than 8,000 photographs

 
Behavioural ecology: Single-celled life can learn
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Behavioural ecology: Single-celled life can learn

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). doi:10.1038/533010d

Slime moulds show signs of learning, suggesting that the process does not require nerves and may have evolved early in the history of life.In a simple form of learning called habituation, an organism learns to ignore continuous stimuli over time. Audrey Dussutour and her

 
Set up a public registry of competing interests
2016-05-04 13:14:58 (4 minutes ago) 

Set up a public registry of competing interests

Nature 533, 7601 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/533009a

Author: Adam G. Dunn

The problem of bias in published research must be tackled in a consistent and comprehensive fashion, says Adam G. Dunn.

 
Corrigendum: Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature18000

Authors: Benoit Chassaing, Omry Koren, Julia K. Goodrich, Angela C. Poole, Shanthi Srinivasan, Ruth E. Ley & Andrew T. Gewirtz

 
No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17444

Authors: R. M. Roettenbacher, J. D. Monnier, H. Korhonen, A. N. Aarnio, F. Baron, X. Che, R. O. Harmon, Zs. Kővári, S. Kraus, G. H. Schaefer, G. Torres, M. Zhao, T. A. ten Brummelaar, J. Sturmann & L. Sturmann

Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north–south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north–south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

 
Culturing of ‘unculturable’ human microbiota reveals novel taxa and extensive sporulation
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17645

Authors: Hilary P. Browne, Samuel C. Forster, Blessing O. Anonye, Nitin Kumar, B. Anne Neville, Mark D. Stares, David Goulding & Trevor D. Lawley

Our intestinal microbiota harbours a diverse bacterial community required for our health, sustenance and wellbeing. Intestinal colonization begins at birth and climaxes with the acquisition of two dominant groups of strict anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. Culture-independent, genomic approaches have transformed our understanding of the role of the human microbiome in health and many diseases. However, owing to the prevailing perception that our indigenous bacteria are largely recalcitrant to culture, many of their functions and phenotypes remain unknown. Here we describe a novel workflow based on targeted phenotypic culturing linked to large-scale whole-genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and computational modelling that demonstrates that a substantial proportion of the intestinal bacteria are culturable. Applying this approach to healthy individuals, we isolated 137 bacterial species from characterized and candidate novel families, genera and species that were archived as pure cultures. Whole-genome and metagenomic sequencing, combined with computational and phenotypic analysis, suggests that at least 50–60% of the bacterial genera from the intestinal microbiota of a healthy individual produce resilient spores, specialized for host-to-host transmission. Our approach unlocks the human intestinal microbiota for phenotypic analysis and reveals how a marked proportion of oxygen-sensitive intestinal bacteria can be transmitted between individuals, affecting microbiota heritability.

 
Neurobiology: Wired for sex
2016-05-04 13:14:57 (4 minutes ago) 

Nature advance online publication 04 May 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17898

Author: Douglas S. Portman

Analysis of a sensory neural circuit in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans reveals that its wiring is sex-specific, and arises through the elimination of connections that are originally formed in both sexes.

 
Getting High on Anti-Diarrhea Drug Can Kill
2016-05-04 13:14:48 (4 minutes ago) 
Some people are taking extremely large doses of the anti-diarrhea medication Imodium in an attempt to get high.
 
Obnoxious but is it a crime?
2016-05-04 13:14:13 (4 minutes ago) 
A routine visit to Target turned into a viral video that has led dozens of women to come forward with troubling stories about the same man.

 
Fantastic space-age "tube turntable" from 1968
2016-05-04 13:10:31 (8 minutes ago) 

Behold the space age beauty of the Paam Tube turntable, created by French designer Yonel Lebovici in 1968. On eBay, they appear to range from a few hundred dollars for non-functional units to US$750 for a working model.

(via Discogs on Instagram and Paddle8)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc3bPSLdXnk

 
Embryo study shows 'life's first steps'
2016-05-04 13:10:30 (8 minutes ago) 
Scientists have developed a technique to grow human embryos in the lab past the point they implant in the womb.
 
APNewsBreak: Woman's body rejecting face transplant
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) -- The Connecticut woman who underwent a face transplant five years ago after being attacked by a chimpanzee is back in a Boston hospital after doctors discovered her body is rejecting the transplant....
 
AP sources: Kasich to end bid for Republican nomination
2016-05-04 13:10:27 (8 minutes ago) 
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - The last man standing in Donald Trump's path to the Republican nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich will end his campaign Wednesday, making Trump the party's presumptive nominee. Three campaign officials told The Associated Press that the Ohio governor plans to announce his decision in a statement from his home state later Wednesday. The officials spoke anonymously because they are not authorized to disclose Kasich's decision. Despite his inabili...
 
Supporting Donald Trump Is the Worst Thing the GOP Could Do
2016-05-04 13:05:39 (13 minutes ago) 
A
 
Robber is shortchanged after coming away with only 35 cents
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — New Orleans police are investigating an armed robbery of two men where the assailant walked away with only 35 cents. Police say the robbery happened Wednesday morning in the city’s Carrollton area. Police said that a 33-year-old man and a 29-year-old man were robbed by a man armed with a semi-automatic […]
 
Man claiming to be bitcoin founder to provide further proof
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright, the man who came forward this week as bitcoin’s founder, says he will provide further proof in the coming days to back up his claims. In a new blog post Tuesday, Wright said proof will include moving some of the earliest-created bitcoin and providing “independently-verifiable documents and […]
 
Laboratory advance provides view of early embryo development
2016-05-04 13:05:33 (13 minutes ago) 

NEW YORK (AP) — New lab techniques have provided the first good look at a crucial but mysterious stage in the development of human embryos, scientists reported Wednesday. The researchers said follow-up research might eventually lead to new treatments for infertility and perhaps new forms of birth control. The work extends the amount of embryonic […]
 
Man assaults friend with chemical spray at mall
2016-05-04 13:05:21 (13 minutes ago) 
 
Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders bring the battle to California
2016-05-04 13:05:17 (13 minutes ago) 
 
Spain issues arrest warrants for Russian officials close to Putin
2016-05-04 13:04:18 (14 minutes ago) 
 
Hulu takes on cable, confirms plan to offer live TV service - CNET
2016-05-04 13:03:55 (15 minutes ago) 
Slated for 2017, the new subscription service would stream network and cable TV shows live instead of a day later. It's yet another way cable-cutters can view live content.
 
Reutersward, Swedish sculptor of twisted gun barrel, dies
2016-05-04 13:00:16 (18 minutes ago) 
HELSINKI (AP) -- Carl Fredrik Reutersward, one of Sweden's best-known modern artists and the creator of the iconic statue of a revolver barrel tied in a knot, has died at the age of 81....
 
Watch: Fired Employee Kills Himself and Co-Worker at Texas Workplace
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
Police say the shooter "became very disgruntled" after being terminated from his job.
 
The Latest: Obama's Arrival in Flint Greeted by Gov. Snyder
2016-05-04 13:00:02 (19 minutes ago) 
President Barack Obama is in Flint, Michigan, where he is bringing a promise of change after lead from old pipes tainted drinking water in the city
 
Man, 45, killed in crash with school bus in Newton County
2016-05-04 12:56:07 (22 minutes ago) 
 
Their Next Act
2016-05-04 12:55:49 (23 minutes ago) 

Juliet is a diva. She’s a looker, and she knows it. Sara can be a bit of a flake. Karen is the athletic one; she’s always had talent, but she’s kind of ornery.

 
Germany: Woman says she was held by horror house couple
2016-05-04 12:55:30 (23 minutes ago) 
BERLIN (AP) - A woman has told German investigators that she was held captive for around three months and was physically abused by a couple who are in custody for the deaths of two other women, police said Wednesday.
 
Frozen Fruit, Veggies Recalled Because of Listeria
2016-05-04 12:54:53 (24 minutes ago) 
 
Stewart Cink takes break to care for wife with cancer
2016-05-04 12:54:05 (24 minutes ago) 
 
Ohio Gov. John Kasich dropping out of presidential race: AP sources
2016-05-04 12:53:55 (25 minutes ago) 

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is leaving the Republican presidential contest, giving Donald Trump a clear path to his party's nomination.

Kasich will announce the end of his underdog White House bid on Wednesday, according to three campaign officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they...

 
Many buildings wrecked in Canada fire
2016-05-04 12:50:20 (28 minutes ago) 
A wildfire has brought "significant destruction" to the Canadian city of Fort McMurray, with 1,600 structures affected, Alberta's provincial premier says.
 
AP sources: Kasich to end bid for Republican nomination
2016-05-04 12:50:17 (28 minutes ago) 
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- Ohio Gov. John Kasich will end his bid for the Republican presidential nomination Wednesday, making Donald Trump the party's presumptive nominee....
 
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